Lux

Old courthouse in Pekin, Tazewell County

Alexander “Lux” Jackson was only 16 years old when the world fell. His father, a night guard, also survived the fall, but died due to complications from diabetes a few months later. Lux continued to live in the four-story Beaux Arts building that had formerly housed the dance club his father helped guard and maintain. Driven by grief, Lux gutted the building and began to turn it into a safe house for other survivors.

One such was the man who would become Lux’s closest friend, Dell Howard. When the number of families living in and around the palace and in the underground tunnels of New York City began to overwhelm Lux’s leadership and generosity, Lux and Dell hatched the idea to create a simple, benevolent government to encourage peace and prosperity among the people and to discourage seedy activities such as tolling and human trafficking.

Upon creation of the council of Judges, Lux accepted responsibility for the borough he had grown up in and where he had taken residence after the fall – The Bronx was named the 7th Jurisdiction and Lux its leader.

Around the same time, while scouring ruins in search of undamaged building materials, Lux happened upon a large, damaged shipping container. Curious, Lux pried open the door. 200 strong men, standing elbow to elbow in rows of four, stood perfectly still in the darkness. A man at the front asked for the judge’s name. Upon learning his name, they informed him that he was now their commander and they would obey him in all matters. After much questioning, Lux realized that the men were a company of androids, advanced beyond anything public before the fall. Pleased by his good fortune, Lux divided the messengers – they called themselves MSNGR1.2s – between the seven judges to serve as a standing militia.

Lux is widely considered to be the most fair and likable of the judges, and is generally well-liked by the citizens of his jd, although some of the more elite residents of the Bronx resent his refusal to follow precedent laid down by the other judges in cases involving disputes between the classes.

Posted on under The World of the 7th Judge... in the words of its citizens.

7 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *